Ibanez Expands SR500 Bass Series

Two new SR500 Series basses designed for the advanced player.

Bensalem, PA (August 31, 2015) -- For 2015, Ibanez is introducing two new SR500 Series basses designed for the advanced player. The SR500TFF and the SR505TFF are 4 and 5-string basses featuring Mahogany bodies with a traditional Tri-Fade Burst Flat finish. Other features include a sturdy 5-piece Jatoba/Bubinga SR neck, a Rosewood fretboard, and a B300 series bridge for superior string vibration transfer and precise intonation.

Electronics include two Bartolini MK1 pickups, designed to deliver a full, punchy tone with a clear, articulate top end. Equalization is handled by the EQB-IIIS 3-band EQ, which includes a 2-way mid-frequency selector switch that focuses the mids control at either 250 or 600hz. This feature aids the player in quickly accessing more useful, popular bass tones. For over 25 years the smooth, fast neck, lightweight body and perfectly matched electronics of the iconic SR Series has continued to grow in popularity among working musicians looking for excellent performance and value.

Features:

SR500TFF
  • 5-pc Jatoba/Bubinga SR4 neck
  • Mahogany body
  • Rosewood fretboard
  • Abalone oval inlay
  • B300 bridge
  • Bartolini MK1 neck pu
  • Bartolini MK1 bridge pu
  • EQB-IIIS 3-band EQ w/ Mid frequency switch
  • Black matte Hardware
LIST: $799.99 SR505TFF
  • 5-pc Jatoba/Bubinga SR5 neck
  • Mahogany body
  • Rosewood fretboard
  • Abalone oval inlay
  • B305 bridge
  • Bartolini MK1 neck pu
  • Bartolini MK1 bridge pu
  • EQB-IIIS 3-band EQ w/ Mid frequency switch
  • Cosmo Black Hardware
LIST: $866.65

For more information:
Ibanez

Jack Broadbent on John Lee Hooker | Hooked

The flask-sliding swashbuckler's turning point with guitar was hearing (and absorbing) the Delta bluesman's thumping, percussive rhythms.

Read More Show less

While Monolord has no shortage of the dark and heavy, guitarist and vocalist Thomas V Jäger comes at it from a perspective more common to pop songsmiths.

Photo by Chad Kelco

Melodies, hooks, clean tones, and no guitar solos. Are we sure this Elliott Smith fan fronts a doom-metal band? (We’re sure!)

Legend has it the name Monolord refers to a friend of the band with the same moniker who lost hearing in his left ear, and later said it didn’t matter if the band recorded anything in stereo, because he could not hear it anyway. It’s a funny, though slightly tragic, bit of backstory, but that handle is befitting in yet another, perhaps even more profound, way. Doom and stoner metal are arguably the torch-bearing subgenres for hard rock guitar players, and if any band seems to hold the keys to the castle at this moment, it’s Monolord.

Read More Show less
x