Kemper Releases the Profiler 7.5 OS

The new updates includes an Acoustic Simulator, Phase Widener, Delay Widener, and Autoswell.

Germany (September 4, 2020) -- Kemper announces the immediate availability of the Kemper Profiler OS 7.5 adding Acoustic Simulator, Phase Widener, Delay Widener, and Autoswell to the Profiler’s arsenal of FX. The Kemper Rig Manager Version 3.0 brings next level Library management and detailed Rig editing features. Both are free downloads for Profiler players.

Acoustic Simulator

This is a simple Stomp that turns an electric guitar signal into a pretty authentic acoustic sounding tone. This is designed for the in-between strumming or fingerpicking parts during a live performance: The exact situation where guitarists would step up to an acoustic guitar mounted on a stand. Profiler players from now on just switch their rig.

For the right seasoning and setting it up for the various guitar and pick up models, the Acoustic Simulator offers the parameters Pickup, Body, Bronze, and Sparkle.

Don‘t expect perfect results, as the mechanics of an acoustic guitar are quite different. The Acoustic Simulator though will simulate the characteristic body resonance and crispness of an acoustic guitar so closely that you might feel able to leave your acoustic guitar at home when you only need it for two or three songs that night.

Phase Widener

The Phase Widener is an effect invented by Kemper. It creates a wide stereo signal from a mono signal without coloring the result at all. Even when summed back to mono, no coloring will occur.

Delay Widener

This is the condensed version of the well-known stereo-widening trick of delaying one side of a stereo signal by several milliseconds. In contrast to the Phase Widener, the Delay Widener is not mono-compatible and should be checked for coloration when used on a recording. Additionally, the Delay Widener will tend to emphasize the non- delayed side - this is a psychoacoustic artifact. Setting the Delay Widener to about 30 ms should lead to a pleasing result. For all Widener effects, it is mandatory to place them after the Stack section, where the effects are processed in stereo.

Auto Swell

Auto Swell mimics a volume pedal swell with every new strike of the strings. The parameter Swell Rate controls the time of the swell, up to a maximum of 4 seconds. While the Swell Rate controls the attack, a complimentary compressor is also included, to shape the decay of the instrument once it has faded in. The Compressor parameter controls the intensity of the compression.

And then some …

Output Filters -

Low Cut and High Cut filters are available. These will affect all outputs.

S/PDIF Slave Mode

Recent models of the classic Profiler units (Head, Rack, PowerHead, and PowerRack) now provide the option to run as a slave to an external clock, as all Profiler Stage units do. This is based on a hardware modification introduced during 2018 and enabled by this OS revision. Units with this capability will show an additional option “Auto/Internal” in the Output Section — this can be found on the same page as SPDIF Volume and SPDIF Clock.

Audio and clock signals are sharing one S/PDIF cable per direction. To avoid crackles and other artifacts two SPDIF cables need to be connected if your Profiler follows an external clock and sends an audio signal for recording. Two cables need to be connected, too, if the Profiler is configured as clock master and receiving an audio signal via SPDIF. We recommend affording two SPDIF cables and leaving them plugged in.

For more information:
Kemper

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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