Line 6 Expands Shuriken Variax Family with the SR250

The new model features a traditional 25.5” scale length and Variax HD technology.

Calabasas, CA (June 26, 2018) -- Line 6 today introduced the Shuriken Variax SR250 guitar. Featuring the same unique contoured body shape and powerful Variax HD technology as the longer-scale Shuriken Variax SR270, the Shuriken Variax SR250 features a traditional 25.5” scale length that will feel familiar to many guitarists, offering exceptional versatility for a wide range of musical styles.

“The original Shuriken Variax guitar has been embraced by guitarists who appreciate the limitless creative possibilities it provides,” said Marcus Ryle, co-founder and President, Line 6. “The Shuriken Variax SR250 offers guitarists the choice of a familiar 25.5” scale length or, with the SR270, players get a longer 27” scale length. Both guitars offer unmatched versatility for any performance scenario.”

Shuriken Variax guitars are modern, high-quality instruments that were developed through a collaboration between Shuriken Guitars, Line 6, and Yamaha Guitar Development.

The Shuriken Variax SR250 allows guitarists to venture beyond the ranges of conventional 6-, 7-, or even 8-string guitars. Variax HD technology provides immediate access to a wide range of guitar models and alternate tunings simply by twisting a knob. Custom guitar models and alternate tunings can also be saved as presets. Guitarists can also design custom instruments and tunings, then load them into the guitar as presets using the free Workbench HD application.

Although the Shuriken Variax SR250 can easily be incorporated into any guitar rig, pairing it with Line 6 Helix, POD HD, or Firehawk modelers unlocks its full potential. Guitarists can create custom presets that change tunings and amp, effect, and guitar model settings, all with the touch of a footswitch.

Pricing & Availability

Shuriken Variax SR250 in Satin Black ($2099.99 MSRP) is scheduled to be available in the U.S. June 2018 and worldwide August 2018.

For more information:
Line 6

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