Mojo Hand Fx Introduces the Sacred Cow Overdrive

Built upon the gold standard of overdrives, the Sacred Cow can cover a range of tones.

Shreveport, LA (November 17, 2015) -- The Sacred Cow is a playful nod to two classics: The legendary, elusive, gold standard overdrive, and the center of Texas culinary tradition, Beef. The Sacred Cow has all of the drive and and character that you would expect, ranging from slightly boosted clean to a nice gain, with some bite, that sits perfectly in a mix. We sought to create an accessible, pedalboard friendly version of this circuit, with some added flexibility, while remaining very faithful to the overall tone.

Controls:

  • Volume - The Volume knob controls the output level. It's perfectly capable of pushing your amp into overdrive, or boosting just above unity gain for that little extra hint of "sauce".
  • Tone - The Sacred Cow has a full range tone control that covers everything from darker subdued tones to brighter, chimey overdrive.
  • Gain - The gain control features a dual-gang pot that essentially blends clean boost and overdrive. It has a very nice sweep that's useable across the entire range of the control.
  • Fatty/Lean Toggle - The "Lean" side of the toggle is basically the standard EQ setting that you would expect from a pedal of this heritage. The "Fatty" side gives you just a touch of extra girth, which comes in very handy when used with lower output, or thinner sounding, guitar pickups.

$175 street

For more information:
MojoHand Fx

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