Nancy Wilson 4 Edward

The short instrumental track, "4 Edward", will appear on Wilson's upcoming solo album.

Co-founder, guitarist and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Nancy Wilson of Heart recently announced her first ever solo album, You and Me, due out on May 7, 2021 via Carry On Music. Today, she releases "4 EDWARD" a tender, heartfelt tribute to her friend, Eddie Van Halen. Featuring a beautiful acoustic guitar instrumental performance from Wilson; a musical eulogy to the guitar legend.


"4 Edward"

Of the track Wilson shares, " When Heart toured with Van Halen I asked Eddie why he never played acoustic guitar, his response 'I don't have one.'" Wilson immediately rectified that situation. "I gave Eddie one of mine and he immediately wrote a song on it that stole my heart. After he passed, it hit me so hard I felt it was time to pay tribute to him."

The album was recorded primarily in Wilson's California home studio, working with her long-time collaborators; Dan Walker on keys, Ryan Waters on guitar, bassist Andy Stoller and Ben Smith on drums plus several special guests also working remotely. Wilson self-produced the entire project along with assistance from first engineer, Matthew Sabin.

Many of the tracks on the new album are originals, but Wilson decided to include a handful of covers by a few of her favorites, including a female perspective of Pearl Jam's "Daughter," a stirring turn of Simon & Garfunkel's "The Boxer" featuring Sammy Hagar, and an ethereal cover of the Cranberries "Dreams," featuring Liv Warfield (Prince) from Wilson's previous band Roadcase Royale. The first single from the album was Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising," which debuted last fall. "During this horrific time in the world, with all this enduring loss, it seemed like the right time for an aspirational song about hope and perseverance," Wilson says. The other eight tracks are originals, mostly acoustic ballads, including a special song that captures the full spectrum of loss, love and redemption in one instrumental coda.

With Heart, Wilson has recorded 16 albums, sold over 35 million albums worldwide, has four Grammy nominations, been honored with the ASCAP Founders Award and was celebrated with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She had previously released one other album with just her name on it, Live at McCabe's Guitar Shop, which captured her playing a set of covers and new songs in 1999. But Wilson considers this her first true solo album, a positive creative move amid a surreal year of loss; life during lock down.

With Wilson's solo debut, as with all the legendary music she's created with Heart, the album ended up as an emotional and intimate conversation between a musician and an audience. "Whether you're performing onstage, or in the studio, it's always about that relationship, and that conversation. It's always been 'you' and 'me.'"

For more information:
Nancy Wilson


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Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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