Positive Grid Unveils ToneCloud

ToneCloud is a sharing platform that allows BIAS users to interact with each other and share their custom amps right inside BIAS.

San Diego, CA (December 19, 2013) -- The recently released BIAS (#1 paid music app in 118 countries) brought a whole new level of tone customization to guitar and bass players through a game changing, intuitive amp modeling and designer app. Today, Positive Grid added an new feature to raise the bar again: ToneCloud - the world’s first custom amp sharing platform.

“ToneCloud is an amp sharing platform with all the amp models you can imagine,” notes Jaime Ruchman, Marketing Manager at Positive Grid. “The ToneShare in JamUp allows musicians to create, share, and download user and artist presets. With ToneCloud, musicians can now explore and get inspired by the whole world’s custom amp models in just seconds. The possibilities are infinite.”

ToneCloud is a sharing platform that allows BIAS users to interact with each other and share their custom amps right inside BIAS. Users can now explore popular and latest custom amp models, and can further search by music genres or keywords. Also, sharing is more intuitive than ever: an upload button is always visible in BIAS no matter in what stage of the amp creation process, this makes sharing much easier and faster.

With ToneCloud, BIAS users will be part of a tone community with social utilities that allow them not only to create and share custom amps, but also interact with other musicians. With ToneCloud, BIAS will deliver much more than 36 amp models: it has the whole world of tone, on the cloud.

Specs:

  • Explore and get inspired by the world’s first custom amp sharing platform.
  • Find popular and latest custom amp models, and search by genre or keywords.
  • “Preview,” “Like,” “Comment,” and “Download” artists and users custom amps.
  • Log in with Facebook for quick access.

For more information:
Positive Grid

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