The 392 takes cues from Detroit

Portland, OR (September 22, 2007) – Soloway Guitars is introducing The 392, the company’s first standardized model. For five years the boutique builder has cranked out dozens of high-end 27” scale length guitars without making two exactly alike. Settling on a model with features and advances from the company’s favorite guitars of the last few years, The 392 represents the look and sound that Jim Soloway is known for.

The 392 gets its name from its trio of Lindy Fralin P92''s. These hum-canceling P90-type pickups are clear, warm and dynamically responsive. They’ve proven to be extremely well-suited for the guitar’s Swan Contour body. Coupled with a 5-way selector, they provide a tremendous variety of usable sounds. Despite the look of a solid body, the Contour shares the same chambered construction and light weight as Soloway’s Swan Original and the No-Hole.

The 392 was inspired by the magnificent muscle cars of the golden era of Detroit– thus the curvy lines and the glittering chrome right up the middle. In keeping with that theme, Soloway stayed with chrome for the hardware and decided on five classic metallic colors: Ice Blue; Lake Placid Blue; Candy Apple Red; Shoreline Gold; and Candy Tangerine.

The 392 is available in a hard tail version for $2700 and a tremolo version for $2850.

Ice Blue SwampAsh Swan LN6 Contour "392"

  • Swamp Ash top
  • Chambered Swamp Ash back
  • One piece Maple Neck
  • Maple fingerboard
  • Black 1/4 inch position markers
  • Candy Apple Red poly finish on body
  • Satin nitro finish on the neck
  • Chrome hardware and pickup rings
  • Chrome knurled knobs with ripple pearl dome tops
  • 3 Lindy Fralin P92 pickups
  • 5 way pickup switch
  • Rosewood truss rod cover with inlaid pearl logo
  • Hip Shot Trem Bridge
  • Hip Shot light weight locking tuners

Candy Apple Red SwampAsh Swan LN6 Contour "392"

  • Swamp Ash top
  • Chambered Swamp Ash back
  • One piece Maple Neck
  • Maple fingerboard
  • Black 1/4 inch position markers
  • Candy Apple Red poly finish on body
  • Satin nitro finish on the neck
  • Chrome hardware and pickup rings
  • Chrome knurled knobs with ripple pearl dome tops
  • 3 Lindy Fralin P92 pickups
  • 5 way pickup switch
  • Rosewood truss rod cover with inlaid pearl logo
  • Hip Shot Trem Bridge
  • Hip Shot light weight locking tuners

For more information:

JimSoloway.com

John 5 on How He Gets Old-School Tones from His Metal-Friendly Tele | The Big 5

Plus, find out which guitar hero the Rob Zombie sideman “begs and pleads” with you to listen to.

Read More Show less

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 12793 site_id=20368559 original_filename="DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/12793/DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 12793, u'media_html': u'DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf'}

Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.

Read More Show less
x