The amp was created in response to artist and backline requests for a Supro amp with a pair of 12” speakers and spring reverb.

Port Jefferson Station, NY (June 8, 2017) -- Supro USA is now shipping the 1685RT Neptune Reverb amplifier: a 25-watt, 2x12 combo amp created in response to artist and backline requests for a Supro amp with a pair of 12” speakers and spring reverb. Developed in partnership with SIR, the USA’s largest backline rental company, the Supro Neptune amplifier is a loud, clear answer to the Fender Twin and the Vox AC-30.

The Neptune’s microphone-friendly midrange is largely derived from its vintage-correct, 25-watt, Class-A power section. It is this unique, “self-biasing” power amp that holds the key to the vintage Supro sound. The Neptune Reverb’s remarkably low noise floor makes this amp perfect for live performance at any volume. Even when pushed hard, the Neptune’s power section overdrives with a distinctive clarity, leaving plenty of front-end headroom for use with all kinds of stompbox effects.

Passive treble and bass EQ controls allow the musician to fine-tune the frequency response of the Neptune’s preamp to accommodate a wide range of pickups and varied stage environments. Once the guitar signal has been shaped by the passive tone-stack, it is fed into a 4-spring 17” long reverb tank which uses all-tube drive and recovery stages to provide the richest possible effect. The Neptune also features a tremolo circuit which occurs in the output section, lending an ethereal shake and wobble to the enveloping wash of tube-driven reverb.

The Neptune’s wide-body combo cab comes covered in our blue rhino hide tolex and loaded with the British-voiced BD12 drivers that were developed for the award-winning Black Magick amplifier, heard on stages around the world in 2016 with Paul Simon, The Cure, Guns N’ Roses and Aerosmith. The Neptune’s custom Supro speakers are wired in parallel at 4 ohms to deliver a truly visceral on-stage experience that clearly translates through large PA systems and records beautifully in live-broadcast situations.

Features:

  • 25 Watts, Class-A power
  • Independent Bass and Treble controls
  • All-tube spring reverb
  • Output-tube tremolo
  • Self-biasing power amp
  • 2x 6973 power tubes
  • 4x 12AX7/ECC83 JJ tubes
  • 1x 12AT7/ECC81 JJ tubes
  • 2x 12” Supro BD12 Black Magick speakers
  • 27 7/8” x 18” x 10 1/2” – 71 x 46 x 26.5 cm
  • 54 lbs
  • Blue Rhino Hide Tolex
  • Assembled in Port Jefferson, NY – USA

The 1685RT Neptune Reverb is available now exclusively at Reverb.com for $1,499 USD.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
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