Cross the bridge to a simple and effective guitar makeover by upgrading your axe’s string-supporting infrastructure.

It's been more than 60 years since the Tune-o-matic made its first appearance, but the ubiquitous guitar bridge design dreamed up by Gibson's Ted McCarty remains an important, revered, and much-copied hardware component on the electric guitar landscape. Lucky for us, we've got plenty of options—including these 10—when it's time for an upgrade

2500na-RE Aluminum

Fashioned after the classic Tune-o-matic, for guitars compatible with the ABR-1 standard, this bridge is crafted from aluminum for fast attack and flat frequency response.

ABM GUITAR PARTS
$120

ABR-style Bridge

Various vintage components were measured and inspected to craft these bridges with the same methods and materials that were used in the late 1950s.

PIGTAIL
$225

GE104B

This modern version of the Tune-o-matic is available in a variety of different finishes and is an attractively priced replacement option for an ABR-1-style bridge.

GOTOH
$30

GTM

These bridges were designed to fit all Les Paul-style guitars, feature special retainer springs to prevent rattles and buzz, and come without pre-slotted saddles for custom string-spacing options.

SCHALLER
$67

TP6G

This Nashville-style Tune-o-matic features “G Formula” notched saddles, which use a proprietary formula based on the nylon saddle material found on guitars from the ’50s and ’60s.

TONEPROS
$70

Babicz FCH Tune-O-Matic

Thanks to the elimination of unwanted space between the bottom of the bridge and the surface of the guitar, this design intends to offer added sustain, stability, and improved fullness and tone.

FULL CONTACT HARDWARE
$199

ResoMax NV2

Outfitted with the company’s String Saver saddles, this triple-plated bridge has an exclusive locking feature that secures the unit magnetically, without the need for tools.

GRAPH TECH
$85

Tone-A-Matic

This bridge’s aircraft-grade aluminum construction offers increased sustain and tone, while its unique saddle design is intended to eliminate saddle rattle and more effectively transfer string energy.

HIPSHOT
$95

Tune-O-Matic Powerbridge

This drop-in Nashville-style bridge delivers acoustic-like sounds thanks to its piezo-loaded design, and it can be run solo or in combination with a guitar’s existing pickups.

FISHMAN
$209

Radiused Tune-o-matic Bridge

This U.S.-milled bridge easily adapts from an 11" radius to either a 10" or 12" radius, and features a lightweight aluminum body, brass screws and saddles, and stainless-steel clips.

SCHROEDER
$100

It’s not difficult to replace the wiring in your pickups, but it takes some finesse. Here’s a step-by-step guide.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. After numerous requests, this month we’ll have a closer look at changing wires on a single-coil pickup. As our guinea pig for this, I chose a standard Stratocaster single-coil, but it’s basically the same on all single-coil pickups and easy to transfer. It’s not complicated but it is a delicate task to not destroy your pickup during this process, and there are some things you should keep in mind.

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The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

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Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

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