Willcox Guitars Introduces the Atlantis ElectroAcoustic Guitar Thinline Edition

Santa Barbara, CA (December 7, 2012) – Measuring 20 millimeters thinner than the wide-body model, the new Atlantis Thinline brings the same quality features of Willcox Guitars’ ElectroAcoustic instrument

Santa Barbara, CA (December 7, 2012) – Measuring 20 millimeters thinner than the wide-body model, the new Atlantis Thinline brings the same quality features of Willcox Guitars’ ElectroAcoustic instrument to a lighter weight, ergonomic design, perfect for all musicians looking for an easy to handle guitar with a rich and versatile tone palette.

The Willcox Guitars Atlantis is exclusively powered by LightWave Systems’ six-string System3 pickup that uses optoelectronics to sense string vibration and translates the analog signals for amplification and recording. The result is an extremely quiet, studio quality output of true, uninfluenced string tone, capable of producing a wide range of sounds including pure acoustic, clean and bright, warm and bluesy, crunchy, and all the way to overdriven shred electric. All Atlantis guitars feature:

• Thinline Chambered Mahogany body with a AAA Flame Maple Top
• Mahogany Neck with Rosewood Fingerboard
• LightWave Systems S3 transducer with active preamp
• Volume control with pull-up tone knob
• Custom NiMH Rechargeable Battery Pack

The Atlantis Guitar is the evolution of more than a decade of research and development. The Atlantis and the LightWave S3 pickups combine to create a technology capable of capturing premium, high-fidelity sound in both a live and studio setting. This guitar is used by Jeff Sturms, Nashville sessions player and touring and studio guitarist for country music legend George Strait.

The Atlantis is designed, engineered, assembled, set up, and tested at the Willcox Guitars facilty in California. Atlantis is finely crafted from premium tonewoods and hardware, in combination with the industrial grade S3 electronics, to assure the highest product quality and reliability.

For more information:
www.willcoxguitars.com

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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