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Yamaha Now Shipping Pocketrak PR7 Recorder

Yamaha Now Shipping Pocketrak PR7 Recorder

Yamaha now shipping the Pocketrak PR7 linear recorder.

Buena Park, CA (July 9, 2013) -- Yamaha today announced that the new POCKETRAK PR7, an easy-to-use, ultra-portable linear recorder that captures effortless high-quality recordings whenever and wherever needed, is now shipping. Equipped with newly developed XY stereo microphones, the PR7 captures high-resolution stereo recordings, achieving consistent quality and natural sound regardless of the surrounding environment. The PR7 will be showcased at Summer NAMM 2013.

An invaluable tool for any musician, the PR7 offers essential practice functions such as an onboard tuner and metronome. It comes with 2GB of internal memory (with the ability to expand the capacity with micro SD/SDHC memory cards) and features long battery life, mic line inputs for microphones or instruments, 24bit/96kHz recording and a built-in speaker.

“For a pocket-sized device, the PR7 comes with powerful recording functions,” said Athan Billias, Marketing Manager, Pro Audio & Combo division. “Despite the sophisticated features, we have made the interface simpler and more intuitive to operate.”

The PR7 is equipped with a dedicated overdubbing button, which allows for the instant addition of solo sections and harmonies over an existing track and the ability to work out respective parts of a song. With this button, musicians can punch in and out at specific sections of an audio file to ensure that only the parts needed are committed to the file. Marker editing lets users insert up to 36 index markers in audio files either during recordings or playback, providing the location of a particular playback position. These markers can also be used to loop a specific section of a file for practicing certain phrases of a song.

Because each environment comes with a different set of recording demands, the PR7 also features five optimized presets tailored to a variety of applications, perfect for rehearsing, songwriting, speaking engagements and field recordings. The presets are optimized with an enhanced High Pass Filter that eliminates low frequency noise along with dynamics control settings, which are customized for different recording environments. Settings include OFF, ideal for capturing musical performances, NEAR, which is suitable for personal instrument practice, BAND, optimal for multi-instrument performances, FIELD for outdoor recordings and SPEECH for meetings, seminars and other speaking situations.

In addition, the PR7 comes with Steinberg’s WaveLab LE audio editing and mastering software that provides 2-track audio editing with high-end EQ and dynamics processing to improve the sound of the audio file. This software also includes professional level VST plug-ins, giving users a wide range of effects for mastering and enhancing tracks.

For more information:
Yamaha

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