Designed in response to players’ demands for a pickup that embodied the transparency and output of an active, with the character and wide dynamic control of a passive

United Kingdom (April 26, 2012) – Designed in response to players’ demands for a pickup that embodied the transparency and output of an active, with the character and wide dynamic control of a passive, Bare Knuckle have launched the Black Hawk humbucker.

Black Hawk humbuckers were designed in response to players' demands for a pickup that embodied the transparency and output of an active, with the character and wide dynamic control of a passive, all without the hassle of batteries. Each coil has a pair of specially annealed nickel plated steel blades which transfer the magnetism to the strings evenly across the width of the coil for perfect string to string balance. These coils are scatter-wound by hand with 42AWG Heavy Formvar wire and then powered by a trio of ceramic magnets for the bridge humbucker and Alnico V magnet for the neck humbucker.

Although on paper the DC resistance is moderate, the specially designed coils and blades, along with the custom calibrated magnets, are capable of huge amounts of power but never at the expense of dynamics. The combination of coil size and winding technique ensure the Black Hawk humbuckers remain extremely reactive to pick attack and changes to the volume pot. 

Low notes have excellent depth and track extremely quickly. High notes remain strong and full no matter how high on the neck with broad mids and solid highs. Clarity throughout all frequencies is exceptional without ever sounding harsh or clinical. The combination of ceramic powered bridge and Alnico V powered neck creates a vast palette of contemporary tones suitable for playing styles as varied as fusion to extreme metal. 

Bridge DC: 8.6KΩ Bridge Magnet: Ceramic
Neck DC: 8KΩ Neck Magnet: Alnico V

A radical pickup with an almost Art Deco look, the Black Hawk creates a vast palette of contemporary tones suitable for playing styles as varied as fusion through to extreme metal.

Available in 6 and 7 string format and suitable for all solid body and semi acoustic guitars.
6 String Black Hawk humbucker - Calibrated Open Set £210.00 / 7-string £220.00
6 String Black Hawk humbucker - Open Bridge or Neck £109.00 / 7-string £114.00

For more information:
bareknucklepickups.co.uk

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