Boss Announces ME-80 Guitar Multiple Effects

The ME-80 sports a knob-driven interface for stompbox-style control.

Los Angeles, CA (January 15, 2014) -- BOSS is pleased to announce the ME-80 Guitar Multiple Effects, a powerful floor-based tone processor with a knob-driven interface for intuitive, stompbox-style control. Featuring an enormous selection of flagship-quality effects and COSM amps, eight multifunction footswitches, battery-powered operation, and much more, the compact ME-80 is perfect for performing guitarists of all levels. Via the BOSS TONE STUDIO editor application, ME-80 users can easily customize sounds and enjoy direct access to free patches and other great content at the newly launched BOSS TONE CENTRAL website.

BOSS TONE CENTRAL is the ultimate destination for all players that use BOSS guitar and bass gear. The initial focus of this powerful new web portal is on the ME-80, but compact pedals and other BOSS multi-effects will be included as the site evolves. Premium ME-80 content available now includes demo videos and free patches created by famous guitarists, touring pros, and session players. Users are encouraged to check back often, as the site will be continuously updated with additional patches, how-to videos, artist interviews, and much more.

The ME-80 contains a history of BOSS effects in one pedal, from overdrives and distortions to wahs, mod effects, pitch shifters, delays, and the latest MDP effects. Also included are nine updated COSM preamps derived from the flagship GT-100, with new additions such as Crunch, Metal, and an AC preamp designed for acoustic/electric guitar. The onboard expression pedal can be used for foot volume and pedal effects like wah, octave shift, and Freeze, and it’s also possible to control effects parameters such as mod rate, delay oscillation, and more.

Unlike typical multi-effects processors that are complicated and unintuitive, using the ME-80 is as easy as using a stompbox. Eight different effects categories can be active simultaneously, and the panel features a total of 30 knobs for instant access to effects selection, sound adjustment, and more. The Pedal FX category has its own dedicated knob for quickly assigning an effects type or function to be controlled by the expression pedal. Favorite settings can be saved in 36 user patch locations, letting players recall custom effects configurations at the touch of a pedal. The flexible ME-80 offers easily selectable modes for individual stompbox-style on/off or traditional patch-based operation. In Manual mode, the effects categories function like individual stomp effects, with direct on/off control via seven footswitches. When entering Memory mode, the footswitches are reconfigured to select user or preset patches and patch banks. One footswitch on the ME-80 is dedicated for mode switching, so users can toggle between Manual and Memory modes at any time. In addition, the eight multifunction footswitches provide convenient access to alternate functions such as tap tempo, tuner, looper control, and more. The newly developed footswitch style provides two switches in the space occupied by one in previous designs, allowing BOSS to outfit the ME-80 with a generous array of foot-operated controls while keeping the unit extremely compact and mobile. The expression pedal has its own integrated toe switch that toggles between foot volume and the current Pedal FX setting. The ME-80 is equipped with a built-in USB audio/MIDI interface for direct recording to DAW software, communication with the BOSS TONE STUDIO application, and more. Available as a free download for Mac and Windows, BOSS TONE STUDIO features an inviting graphical interface for editing and organizing ME-80 patches. If the user’s computer has Internet access, the software also provides an integrated connection to the BOSS TONE CENTRAL website, allowing them preview and download gig-ready patches created by top guitar pros directly into the ME-80.

For more information:
Boss

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Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
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• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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