Boss releases a variety of new gear, such as the Waza Amp Head and Cabinet, Craft VB-2W Vibrato, and the ES-5 Effects Switching System.

Waza Craft VB-2W Vibrato
Release Date: January 2016

Originally produced from 1982 to 1986, the VB-2 Vibrato is a rare BOSS pedal that has become highly prized on the used market through the years. This innovative analog stompbox creates vibrato with true pitch modulation, enabling guitarists and bassists to achieve rich, expressive effects without physically bending their strings. For example, players can easily produce consistent, controlled vibrato sounds similar to fretless string instruments like violin and cello, and apply natural vibrato to full chords without using a whammy bar. At extreme settings, the pedal is also capable of warble sounds and dramatic special effects.

With the Waza Craft VB-2W, BOSS has recreated the original pedal while adding more range and control. In Standard mode, the VB-2W faithfully reproduces the warm, BBD-driven analog tone of the VB-2. Like the original, the user can adjust the vibrato rate and depth, and also control the time it takes for the effect to reach full intensity (called the “rise time”). A Latch setting provides normal stompbox on/off control, while Unlatch engages the effect only when the pedal switch is held, perfect for naturally applying vibrato effects as needed while playing.

Flipping the VB-2W’s mode switch to Custom produces a newly developed vibrato tone that offers more depth than the original effect. In addition, a low-pass filter moves along with the pitch for bold low-range tones. The VB-2W also features a jack for controlling the effect depth with an optional expression pedal, or via the powerful external control capabilities of the BOSS ES-8 Effects Switching System.

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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