Cort Unveils the GB74 Gig Bass

The new model incorporates the sounds of the humbucker, J-style single-coil and P-style split-coil.

Seoul, South Korea (August 13, 2019) -- Working bass players know the importance of finding the right tone, and with the new GB74 Gig from Cort Guitars, they no longer have to compromise or compensate to achieve it. The GB74 Gig incorporates the sounds of the humbucker, J-style single coil and P-style split-coil to offer bass players the ultimate sonic versatility. From meaty and powerful tones to clear and smooth character, the GB74 Gig delivers both classic and modern bass sounds, packaged in a sleek profile with Lake Placid Blue finish and chrome hardware.

The versatility of the GB74 Gig is made possible through controls that are simple yet expansive. The unique Multitone bridge humbucker delivers meaty and growling humbucker sounds as well as clear and open single-coil sounds. The 3-way toggle switch allows the player to access the inner or outside coils or both to get the best of both worlds in one great-sounding bass humbucker. Additionally, the VTB-P is a traditional split-coil P-style neck pickup with a vintage-flavored tone. The pickup balancer knob enables the player to choose or mix in the P-style for even greater tonal versatility. Passive tone control is also included to expand the tonal variety even further.

In addition to its advanced electronics, the GB74 Gig offers key structural improvements for tonal integrity. All strings lead to the Omega bridge, an important sonic enhancement made from high-density, die-cast zinc that’s rock solid, yet fully adjustable, and offers 2.25’’ string spacing and a base footprint of 3 7/32’’ by 2 15/32’’. The spoke nut hotrod truss rod ensures smooth and precise setting of the neck bow, while the truss rod adjustment feature allows the player to conveniently dial in the exact amount of neck bow depending on the desired technique and playing style.

Material choice also factors into the GB74 Gig’s sonic personality. The alder body provides a deep, big and warm acoustic character that sits perfectly in the mix without interfering with the frequencies of other instruments in the ensemble. The maple fingerboard not only provides power and stability, but also contributes to a warm, beefy and punchy tone with a strong upper midrange. It’s dense and rigid, yet has the right amount of tactile flexibility, responding sensitively to picking attack and slapping techniques with plenty of articulation. Overall, the Canadian hard maple neck has 21 frets at a 34’’ scale. Hipshot Ultralite tuners greatly reduce the weight of the headstock and offer excellent tuning precision and stability.

$599 street

For more information:
Cort

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