The Z-Glide guitar neck is precisely engraved with carefully tested patterns which reduce surface area while trapping moisture and sweat for an ultra fast neck with a consistent, silky-smooth feel.

Chicago, IL (January 11, 2011) – DBZ Guitars announces a new breakthrough in guitar neck design. Unveiling of DBZ’s cutting edge new necks, called the Dean B Zelinsky "Z-Glide" Reduced Friction Neck (patent pending) will take place at the 2011 NAMM show January 13 in Anaheim, California.



The Z-Glide guitar necks, which will be available as an option on DBZ USA Custom Shop Guitars, utilize a surface designed to let your hand glide effortlessly up and down the neck. Dean Zelinsky’s Z-Glide necks eliminate the sticky/clammy feeling gloss lacquered necks are known to produce.

Invented by company founder Dean Zelinsky, the revolutionary Z-Glide guitar neck is achieved by precisely engraving carefully tested patterns into the back of the neck which reduce surface area while trapping moisture and sweat. The result is an ultra fast neck with a consistent, silky-smooth feel.

“This is likely the first real breakthrough in guitar design in many years”, explained Dean B. Zelinsky, CEO of DBZ Guitars. “No other company has aggressively addressed the surface feel of guitar necks. For other companies, satin or un-finished necks is the “solution” and has been for years…but neither satin or un-finished comes close to what the Z-Glide achieves in feel and playability. I believe the protection the finish provides is important which was part of the inspiration of developing the Z-Glide neck…the magic happens underneath the finish,” concluded Zelinsky.

The Z-Glide neck will only be available as an option on USA made DBZ models for 2011. MSRP for the Z-Glide reduced friction neck option is $300

For more information:
DBZ Guitars

Source: Press Release
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Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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