Emma Electronic Releases the ND-1 Navigator Hybrid Delay Pedal

The pedal aims to offer practical, usable delay functions in a unique configuration that can generate classic delay tones as well as many unique new sounds.

Clifton, NJ (November 21, 2018) -- Combining the best of analog and digital technology, the ND-1 Navigator delay from EMMA Electronic offers practical, usable delay functions in a unique configuration that can generate classic delay tones as well as many unique new sounds. Tap-tempo, modulation, beat-splits, trails, wet/dry outputs - All this and more in a compact package that’s simple to use and simply sounds gorgeous.

The Navigator’s most unique feature is a separate Level control for the beat-split delay repeats. This option allows the user to emphasize the second delay voice, or to turn the main delay off entirely to create interesting new rhythmic delay effects.

Features:

  • TIME – Controls length of main Delay repeat.
  • FEEDBACK - Controls amount of Delay repeats.
  • MAIN D – Controls level of main Delay voice.
  • SECOND – Controls level of beat-split Delay voice.
  • COLOR – Controls the tonality of the Delay voice, from dark to bright.
  • SPEED – Controls rate of Modulation from slow to fast.
  • DEPTH – Controls degree of Modulation from subtle to extreme.
  • BEAT-SPLIT SWITCH – Selects time interval for the secondary Delay voice.
  • TAIL – Turns on “delay trails” function so that repeats will continue in bypass.
  • TAP TEMPO – Allows user to tap in the Delay time with their foot.
  • WET/DRY OUTPUTS –Splits wet and dry signals to separate outputs.
  • POWER – 9-Volt battery or 9VDC power adaptor 70mA current draw.
  • BYPASS – Buffered bypass with low impedance output.
  • STREET PRICE - $279

For more info on EMMA Electronic products including video demos of the ND-1 Navigator, please visit our website www.godlyke.com, e-mail us at info@godlyke.com or call us at 973-777-7477.

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