The company announced new signature guitars for guitarists Bill Kelliher, Brian “Head” Welch, and Lars Frederiksen.

Gary Holt LTD GH-600NT

Anaheim, CA (January 19, 2017) -- Banking on the fact that musicians want to play what their heroes play, ESP Guitars (NAMM Booth #208A/B) has once again drawn from their impressive artist endorsement roster to create new Signature Series instruments being introduced at the NAMM Show.

The company announced a new signature guitar for guitarist Bill Kelliher of the widely-respected American rock band Mastodon, who joined the ESP artist family in 2015. The LTD Bill Kelliher Sparrowhawk offers set-thru construction at 24.75” scale, with mahogany body, 3-piece mahogany neck, ebony fingerboard, a TonePros locking TOM bridge and tailpiece, and Kelliher’s Lace Sensor Divinator signature pickups. The Sparrowhawk is being offered in Military Green Sunburst Satin finish

Brand new to the company’s endorsement roster, Brian “Head” Welch is a guitarist and co-founder of the influential nu metal group Korn. His signature model, the LTD SH-7ET, is a 7-string guitar providing the latest in technologies that include the innovative EverTune constant tension bridge and Fishman Fluence pickups. The neck-thru-body design has a flamed maple top over its basswood body, a 3-piece maple neck with ebony fingerboard and glow-in-the-dark side dots, and it comes in See Thru Purple finish. Another recent addition to the ESP roster is Lars Frederiksen of the seminal punk rock band Rancid. His first ESP Signature Series guitar is the LTD Volsung, a set-neck model based on the Viper body style. It includes the artist’s own Seymour Duncan Lars Signature pickups, Gotoh tuners, and TonePros locking TOM bridge and tailpiece, and comes in a killer Danish Camo Satin finish.

ESP also announced new and updated signature models for other musicians on their roster. These include the LTD GH-600NT, a new version of the popular model for Gary Holt (Slayer/Exodus) with a TonePros locking TOM bridge and tailpiece. Frank Bello, bassist of Anthrax, has updated his Signature Series offerings with the ESP Frank Bello Jazz and LTD FB-J4. Rob Caggiano, guitarist for the popular Danish metal band Volbeat, has updates for his signature guitars with the ESP Rob Caggiano QM and LTD RC-600QM. Both models feature quilted maple tops and silver accent colors. Finally, another ESP artist getting his first-ever signature bass is John Campbell of Lamb of God, whose LTD JC-4FM is based on the Stream body style.

Detailed information on the entire line of ESP, ESP-E-II, and LTD Signature Series guitars and basses is available at the ESP Guitars web site at www.espguitars.com.

For more information:
ESP Guitars

Plus, the Fontaines D.C. axeman explains why he’s reticent to fix the microphonic pickup in his ’66 Fender Coronado.

Read More Show less

The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

Read More Show less

Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

Read More Show less
x