Fender honors them and their distinctive sounds with the new Chris Shiflett Signature Telecaster Deluxe and the Nate Mendel P Bass.

Scottsdale, AZ (October 2, 2012) – Through their monster work with the Foo Fighters, lead guitarist Chris Shiflett and bass player Nate Mendel have helped shape the sound of modern alternative rock. Fender now honors them and their distinctive sounds with the new Chris Shiflett Signature Telecaster Deluxe and the Nate Mendel P Bass.

Shiflett’s abiding love for Telecasters and for huge humbucking sound now comes together in one kickass new instrument with his name on it–the Chris Shiflett Signature Telecaster Deluxe. Eminently affordable and modeled closely on Shiflettt’s favorite ’72 Tele Deluxe, it features a striking Arctic White finish, a four-ply white pearl pickguard, a roaring pair of new custom-designed high-output humbucking pickups, a 12"-radius rosewood fingerboard for easy bends with low action, custom-stenciled hard-shell case, and Shiflett’s signature on the headstock.

"Fender is as good as it gets for a guitar player," said Shiflett. "So to have one with my name is a pretty special feeling. The setup is perfect for me, and to be able to take the time to look at the guitar from a few different angles really pays dividends."

Throughout a long career that started with hardcore punk and flourished first with Sunny Day Real Estate and then the Foo Fighters, there has really only been one main instrument for melodic yet hard-hitting bassist Nate Mendel–his 1971 Precision. Fender now brings you the Nate Mendel P Bass, modeled after his beloved, battle-hardened instrument.

The Nate Mendel P Bass shares the same subtly idiosyncratic and distinctive features as the original, with special body contours, extra-slim neck and nut width, a lightly worn Candy Apple Red finish with a black pickguard, a powerful Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound™ split single-coil pickup, Badass II bridge for rock-solid sustain and stability, and Mendel’s signature on the headstock. It also comes with a spare neck plate engraved with a special hybrid Foo Fighters/Fender logo and a deluxe gig bag.

"The final product is exactly what I wanted," said Mendel. "Fender was great and took the bass to find a way to copy the shape of the neck; I’m super excited about it. Once you land on a P Bass, that’s kind of where you stay."

For more information:
www.fender.com

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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