Nashville, TN (July 11, 2012) – The newly redesigned Loudbox Performer acoustic instrument amplifier introduced by Fishman at 2012 Summer NAMM offers more power, improved bass response and enhanced

Nashville, TN (July 11, 2012) – The newly redesigned Loudbox Performer acoustic instrument amplifier introduced by Fishman at 2012 Summer NAMM offers more power, improved bass response and enhanced features in a lighter, more efficient form factor.

Fishman’s most powerful amplifier, the Loudbox Performer features 180 watts of clear bi-amplified acoustic sound and two flexible mic/instrument input channels that accept both ¼” and XLR sources. Each channel includes Fishman 3-band EQ (shelving bass and treble with resonant-style midrange), feedback-fighting Phase switch and Notch filter controls, and a new dual digital effects section with Reverb, Chorus, Flanger, Delay, Echo and Slap Echo.

The Performer’s 3-way design delivers clear, full-sound with additional low end to balance the premium neodymium tweeter and dedicated midrange driver. The lightweight cabinet design features a built-in 100 tilt with an improved, integrated kickstand design that allows the Loudbox Performer to be tilted back 500 for optimal sound projection.

Enhanced features for the Performer include independent channel and effects level controls; an auxiliary stereo input with level control plus ¼” and 1/8” connectors; balanced XLR D.I. outputs on each channel and main mix, and Channel Mute to silence both input channels.

Weighing in at an easy 30 lbs., the Performer also features a Headphone output; a dedicated effects loop; a Footswitch (available separately) to control Channel Mute or Chorus Mute; and 24V phantom power for condenser microphones. The ¼” and XLR inputs include a 10dB pad and clip indicator.

For more information:
www.fishman.com

Jack Broadbent on John Lee Hooker | Hooked

The flask-sliding swashbuckler's turning point with guitar was hearing (and absorbing) the Delta bluesman's thumping, percussive rhythms.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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