The 100-watt monsters feature three channels, two of which are from Dave's legendary past—BE, HBE, and completely revamped clean channel in the Smallbox Plexi.

(July 26, 2019) -- For over a decade Dave Friedman's "BE" circuit has been hailed as the epitome of British tone. In recent years, this tonal infusion has made the BE-100 the most popular and sought after 100 Watt boutique amp by a mile. The new BE-100 Deluxe, like its little brother the BE-50 Deluxe, takes this BE circuit to a whole new level.

All of the astoundingly flexible and gorgeous-sounding tonal characteristics of the original BE-100 are on tap with the new deluxe model. The deluxe version is now a fully featured three channel amp. An additional gain and master for the HBE channel; a new plexi clean channel borrowed from the coveted Smallbox amp; and new tone shaping tools including a response switch, thump frequency switch and thump knob are just some of the features at your disposal with Dave's new flagship amp.

BE and HBE overdrive channels
Friedman’s BE and HBE drive channels have earned their reputation for high-gain crunch, clarity and nuance. The deluxe model doubles this up with two separate gain and masters, allowing you to explore the wide spectrum of each circuit.

Smallbox Plexi Channel
The BE-100 Deluxe boasts a completely new clean channel inspired by the plexi channel of the Smallbox amp. Not only does it clean up nicely, but it can bring out that iconic plexi grit which can be shaped using the gain, volume and three band EQ controls.

Flexible master section
The BE-100 Deluxe not only grants you complete control of the three pre-amp channels, but the critical power section as well. This astounding flexibility starts on the front panel where you’re able to tune the amp’s overall character with a presence knob, three position switches for frequency and response, as well as a thump knob control. Every player is different in a variety of unique ways. These tools allow you to finely sculpt the overall tone of the power section to YOUR liking - think of it as an EQ for your power amp.

Transparent Effects Loop
Effects loops can be suck tone. Dave has un-sucked this problem with the most transparent effects loop in the business. Plug into it and you won't even know it's there!

Specs:

  • 100 Watt all-tube head
  • Three channels
  • Handwired in the USA
  • Custom USA made transformers
  • 4 x EL34 power tubes
  • 5 x 12AX7 preamp tubes
  • BE channel - Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble (shared with the HBE channel)
  • HBE channel - Gain, Master, Bass, Middle, Treble (shared with the BE channel)
  • Plexi channel - Gain, Volume, Bass, Middle, Treble and fat switch
  • C45 voicing switch (BE / HBE channel)
  • Saturation switch - adds saturation
  • Voice switch - varies top end response
  • Gain Structure switch - Lowers gain of BE / HBE channel
  • Ultra-transparent series effects loop
  • Response switch - varies negative feedback
  • Frequency switch – changes frequency of the Thump knob
  • Thump knob - varies lowered response of amp
  • Two button foot switch for channel selections
  • 4, 8 and 16 ohm Impedance selector switch
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty
  • Dimensions: 8.75" (D) x 29.25" (W) x 12.25" (H)
  • Weight: 43 lbs

Watch the company's demo:

For more information:
Friedman

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Advanced

Beginner

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