The bass is armed with a six-bolt neck and Leo Fender-designed Saddle-Lock bridge to transfer all the energy right into the body.

Fullerton, California (October 5, 2016) -- What happens when you pack Leo Fender's potent Magnetic Field Design bass humbucker into the sleek shape of his SB-2? The new G&L Kiloton. Explosive power that's easy to handle.

Kiloton's silhouette is the most comfortable bass body ever created by Leo. It's compact and pure, with every curve and contour perfectly executed. And now it's carrying more firepower than ever, with Leo's G&L Magnetic Field Design humbucker placed right in the sweet spot he specified back when the G&L factory was still called CLF Research.

Kiloton's single MFD 'bucker fires without the aid of a preamp, while a 3-position series/split/parallel toggle harnesses the coils' power. Simple volume and tone controls are devastatingly effective, revealing the wide range of textures Leo's MFD bucker is famous for. Kiloton is armed with a 6-bolt neck and Leo Fender-designed Saddle-Lock bridge to transfer all the energy right into the body for an incredibly resonant instrument.

The new Kiloton features:

  • G&L humbucker and body shape designed by Leo Fender
  • Series/split/parallel mini-toggle
  • 1 1/2" nut-width, medium-C neck profile
  • Medium-jumbo, Plek-dressed frets

The Kiloton starts at MSRP $2,000 with street price of about $1,399.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
G&L Guitars

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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