G&L is proud to announce the launch of the G&L Superhawk Jerry Cantrell Signature Model, available in two USA-made versions.

Fullerton, CA (February 15, 2013) -- Twenty-something years ago, Jerry Cantrell bought his first G&L Rampage while working at a Dallas music store, and he still rocks ‘em hard today. But what Jerry didn’t discover at the time was the G&L Superhawk, a hard-charging model like the Rampage but equipped with twin ‘buckers. That’s changed and so will rock history.

It’s been well over two decades since a Superhawk was last produced. Now G&L is proud to announce the launch of the G&L Superhawk Jerry Cantrell Signature Model, available in two USA-made versions.

The Superhawk starts out with the same soft maple body and fast-playing hard rock maple neck with ebony fingerboard as the Rampage. It even shares the same Seymour Duncan JB pickup in the bridge position, but adds a Seymour Duncan ’59 in the neck position as well as a 3-position pickup selector and tone control with push/pull coil split. The Rampage’s Kahler vibrato is swapped for a G&L Saddle Lock hardtail bridge for improved comfort, stronger sustain and rock-solid tuning stability. This axe is all about capturing the Jerry Cantrell feel while offering more tonal versatility.

After decades of playing Ivory-colored G&L Rampages, Jerry was looking to add some flair to the mix of G&Ls he plays on stage. Superhawk Deluxe answers that call, adding a premium flamed maple top to the soft maple body, with a choice of Blueburst or Blackburst finishes and chrome hardware for contrast.

Look for both new G&L Superhawks on the 2013 Alice In Chains tour.

For more information:
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