Baroness Yellow & Green Relapse Records Baroness believes in Darwinism. The Southern metal band’s 2007 Red Album was a raw, chest-pounding, bruising debut, whereas 2010’s Blue Record evolved into a

Baroness
Yellow & Green
Relapse Records


Baroness believes in Darwinism. The Southern metal band’s 2007 Red Album was a raw, chest-pounding, bruising debut, whereas 2010’s Blue Record evolved into a much more dynamic, progressive-metal package. Baroness’ third full-length and double LP, Yellow & Green, shows a band walking upright, fully realizing its potential.

“Take My Bones Away” and “The Line Between” are the album’s most accessible songs with their octave-fuzz distorted guitars and fast-paced nature. Equally appealing is when guitarists John Baizley and Peter Adams harmonize à la Thin Lizzy. Lead vocalist Baizley unleashes his most true singing effort ever—best heard in slower songs. Complex, melodious guitar parts and synth-infused textures are balanced with subdued instrumental passages and acoustic numbers similar to Metallica’s intros for “Battery” and “Fight Fire with Fire.”

Yellow & Green captures a band in an organic maturation from its primal sludge roots, while the accessible nature of the music has the potential to catapult Baroness to larger audiences, much like Metallica’s Black Album. —Chris Kies

Must-hear track: “Take My Bones Away”

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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