Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

NUX Tape Echo Review

NUX Tape Echo Review

A satisfying, compact digital Space Echo facsimile that offers looping, tap tempo, and more.

A smart control interface that enables cool realtime Space Echo emulations. Tap tempo. Looper. Small and sturdy. Stereo outs.

Repeats can sound a touch thin. Looper can feel clunky at times.

$179

NUX Tape Echo
nuxefx.com

4
4.5
4.5
4.5

The Roland RE-201 Space Echo is one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century. So, any compact digital approximation that offers some of its creative functionality and even a fraction of its rich sounds is bound to be fun. NUX’s Tape Echo comes up a little short in terms of replicating the deep, foggy tonalities of a Space Echo (what digital pedal doesn’t?). But the addition of looping functionality and tap tempo, as well as a satisfying reverb that doesn’t sound worlds away from a big Fender spring unit, make it a tempting tour pal.


Save for controls for reverb, input, and output level (which are a big deal for many original RE-201 users), the NUX unit’s control set approximates that of the Space Echo. And the interface is great. The small digital readout, while hard to read on account of its tiny size, provides useful graphical representations of the on/off positions of the three virtual tape heads and the delay time. (Maximum delay for the heads are a fairly authentic 183, 366, and 550 ms, though you can create delay times up to 1600 ms with the tap tempo switch.) The compact dial arrangement also makes it easy to create realtime, dramatic pitch shift and swelling oscillation effects with ease. These effects are some of the real joys of a genuine Space Echo, and the fact that you can so readily achieve those effects on the fly is awesome. With an external expression pedal (not included) you can probe this interactivity even further. That long list of features makes the NUX a value at $179.

Yungblud's first signature features a mahogany body, P-90 Pro pickup, and SlimTaper C profile neck.

Read MoreShow less

Need big tones in a small setup? Here’s a collection of lunchbox-sized amps that pack a punch.

Not every gig requires a pair of 4x12 cabs and a 100-watt head. (Sadly.) We’ve rounded up a handful of lunchbox-sized heads that can deliver crystal-clean tones, dirty crunch, and ripping lead tones—all in a very portable package.

Read MoreShow less

On this season finale episode, the actor and musician leads a Prine-inspired songwriting session about how few tools we have in our collective toolbox.

Read MoreShow less

John Mayall in the late ’80s, in a promo shot for his Island Records years. During his carreer, he also recorded for the Decca (with the early Bluesbreakers lineups), Polydor, ABC, DJM, Silvertone, Eagle, and Forty Below labels.

He was dubbed “the father of British blues,” but Mayall’s influence was worldwide, and he nurtured some of the finest guitarists in the genre, including Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Harvey Mandel, Coco Montoya, and Walter Trout. Mayall died at his California home on Monday, at age 90.

John Mayall’s career spanned nearly 70 years, but it only took his first four albums to cement his legendary status. With his initial releases with his band the Bluesbreakers—1966’s Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton; ’67’s A Hard Road, with Peter Green on guitar; plus the same year’s Crusade, which showcased Mick Taylor—and his solo debut The Blues Alone, also from 1967, Mayall introduced an international audience of young white fans to the decidedly Black and decidedly American genre called blues. In the subsequent decades, he maintained an active touring and recording schedule until March 26, 2022, when he played his last gig at age 87. It was reported that he died peacefully, on Monday, in his California home, at 90.

Read MoreShow less