The retro rocker opens up about retrofitting reissues, returning to the JTM45s, and finding the piece of gear that changed his life.

“This is probably my favorite piece of gear in the entire world,” admits Perri, when he points to this 1965 Fender 6G15 Reverb Unit. “I got hip to this through my friend Erick Coleman, aka “Tonechaser”—it changed my entire life.”

Special thanks to Derek Brad for additional video footage.


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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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