The multi-instrumentalist, producer, and all-around sonic shaman explains the origin story on his No. 1 “Foamy," discusses fixing Clapton’s “Fool” SG, and reveals how he stays musically energized after nearly 50 years.

During a stripped-down tour stop at Nashville’s City Winery, guitarist-producer Todd Rundgren spent nearly 40 minutes with PG's Chris Kies chatting gear and how he stays forward-thinking in music. In addition, bandmates guitarist Jesse Gress and bassist Kasim Sulton fire up their traditional setups.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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Johnny Winter's Burning Blues by Corey Congilio

Learn to rip like one of the all-time masters of modern electric blues.

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