GJ2 Introduces the New Arete 3 Star Guitar

The new line of guitars is made at the same facility as the company’s original top-of-the-line models, but is designed to meet the needs of players looking for USA-made craftsmanship at a more accessible price point.

Laguna Hills, CA  (August 15, 2012) – GJ2, the Orange County-based guitar manufacturer founded by Grover Jackson, has released a new model that combines quality design and playability at an attractive price, the Arete (Ah- re-tay) 3 Star. The new line of guitars is made at the same facility as the company’s original top-of-the-line models, but is designed to meet the needs of players looking for USA-made craftsmanship at a more accessible price point.

Construction is neck through body and uses Sapele, a visually and sonically beautiful wood. The Arete 3 Star comes with “Habanero” pickups, which are designed and made in-house by GJ2. The guitars are offered with a choice of fixed bridge or tremolo. The tremolo model features the Bladerunner “Supervee” tremolo unit, which offers great feel and tonal response.

Founder Grover Jackson, who personally oversees the construction of each guitar, explained how GJ2 could offer USA-made quality at lower price. “We wanted more players to be able to enjoy a well-made guitar, so took out some of the fancier decorative touches that don’t affect the tone or playability. For example, instead of mother of pearl inlays on the fingerboard and head, the 3 Star uses pearloid fret markers. This model also has a gig-bag instead of our super quality hard case. The 3 Star has the same great design and playability as our top model, but at a price that makes it more accessible.”

The GJ2 Arete 3 Star electric is available in three striking looks: Natural, Midnight and Oxblood. Priced from $1,899, the guitar also includes a gig-bag and strap.

For more information:
gj2guitars.com

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