Gretsch Announces Cliff Gallup Signature Model and Expands Duane Eddy's Lineup

The Duo Jet features dual DynaSonic pickups, rosewood fretboard with “big block” pearloid inlays, compensated aluminum bridge with aluminum base, and a Bigsby B3BBST vibrato tailpiece.

Scottsdale, AZ (December 8, 2016) -- Gretsch is extremely proud to introduce the all-new G6128T-CLFG Cliff Gallup Signature Duo Jet and the expansion of the G6120 Duane Eddy Signature model with two new limited edition finishes.

G6128T-CLFG Cliff Gallup Signature Duo Jet

Original-era master Cliff Gallup’s tastefully fleet-fingered work hot-rodded dozens of classics by Gene Vincent and his Blue Caps in the latter half of the 1950s. Soft-spoken in manner, Gallup was anything but with a Duo Jet in his hands, turning in solos and backing tracks of startling proficiency and truly raising the bar (and the roof) for rockabilly and early rock ‘n’ roll guitarists. His contributions have inspired generations, and legends like Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck credit Gallup's innovative technique as a major influence on their highly successful careers.

A finely crafted celebration of Gallup’s 1954 model, the G6128T-CLFG Cliff Gallup Signature Duo Jet rocks all the essential ingredients of his time-honored signature sound, including dual DynaSonic pickups, rosewood fretboard with “big block” pearloid inlays, compensated aluminum bridge with aluminum base, Bigsby B3BBST vibrato tailpiece with black painted trough and fixed arm, classic “arrow” control knobs, flat-wound strings, and a dark-stained headstock bearing Gallup’s signature on the truss rod cover.

G6120 Duane Eddy Signature Limited Edition Hollow Body with Bigsby

Celebrate the legendary and pioneering tone of Grammy award winner, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and Musicians Hall of Fame member Duane Eddy with the new G6120 Duane Eddy Signature Limited Edition Hollow Body with Bigsby models.

Enjoy classic styling and full, resonate sound with these single-cutaway beauties that combine modern Gretsch upgrades along with features based directly on Eddy’s original 1957 G6120 model, heard on many of his chart-topping hits.

Traditional features include twin DynaSonic single-coil pickups, Bigsby B6CB tailpiece with DE handle, trestle bracing, brass nut, special neck profile and unique headstock shape, along with modern Gretsch appointments such as extended Bigsby string mount pins and Tru-Arc “rocking” bar bridge.

This signature instrument is available in two new limited edition Black and Pearl White finishes. The Black lacquer version is highlighted with aged white binding, while the durable urethane Pearl White guitar features tortoiseshell binding.

For more information:
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