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Ibanez Introduces New Phaser and Booster Mini Pedals

The Phaser Mini is produced in Japan and features a three control layout along with switchable stage modes.

Ibanez

Bensalem, PA (January 15, 2021) -- Ibanez is introducing two new additions to its Mini pedal lineup, the Phaser Mini and Booster Mini.

The Phaser Mini is produced in Japan and features a three control layout; Depth, Feedback and Speed. Through these controls, the Phaser Mini offers a variety of sounds ranging from subtle texture to deep saturation. Moreover, it is designed to retain a clarity of dry signal even when set to the highest effect intensity. It also features switchable STAGE mode, 4 or 6. 4-STAGE mode delivers traditional Phaser tones, typically used in classic rock. 6-STAGE mode provides more intense and dramatic effect. The PHMini also features 100 percent pure analog circuitry and a true bypass switch.

The Booster Mini also features a three control layout; BASS, TREBLE and LEVEL. Unlike a single knob booster, the BASS and TREBLE EQ enables significant tonal flexibility. For example, while set to the “Wide Range” setting (Turing Bass and Treble all the way up) the guitar tone will become broader, with more volume and presence across the entire frequency range, and the “Mid Boost” setting is ideal for cutting though a band mix. All of the design, development, production, and quality control for the BTMini has been done in Japan. The BT Mini also features a Japanese-made JRC MUSES 8820, a high-quality op-amp used in amplifiers that delivers tonal brightness, even while the amp is pushed into overdrive. A true bypass switch provides the shortest, most direct signal path, as well as the cleanest possible sound.

Both of these new pedals provide enhanced tonal flexibility and expanded creative possibilities, while occupying Minimal space on your pedalboard.

Phaser Mini

  • Depth, Feedback and Speed controls
  • Stage switch (Stage 4 / Stage 6)
  • True Bypass
  • Power supply: External DC 9 Volt AC adapter (Center negative)
  • Made in Japan

LIST: $171.42

ESTIMATED STREET PRICE: $119.99

Booster Mini

  • Bass, Level and Treble controls
  • Max. Gain: +24dB
  • True Bypass
  • Power supply: External DC 9 Volt AC adapter (Center negative)
  • Made in Japan

LIST: $142.84

ESTIMATED STREET PRICE: $99.99

For more information:
Ibanez

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