Nashville, TN (July 12, 2012) – Since Lâg Guitars (Booth 906) debuted in the U.S. in 2010, their Tramontane series of acoustic guitars have been growing in popularity among

Nashville, TN (July 12, 2012) – Since Lâg Guitars (Booth 906) debuted in the U.S. in 2010, their Tramontane series of acoustic guitars have been growing in popularity among a wide range of guitarists, from beginners to pros. Now, Lâg is proud to announce the U.S. debut of two solid body electric guitar series, Arkane and Imperator. These guitars, which have been popular across Europe for many years, will now be available for the first time to guitarists in the United States as of July 2012.

The Lâg Arkane double cutaway and Lâg Imperator single cutaway are available in color combinations ranging from solid finishes to burst finishes with quilted & flame tops. These guitars offer hardware combinations of black and nickel. The Arkane offers stoptail and Floyd Rose options, while the Imperator offers a Tune-O-Matic stoptail bridge. Pickups for both series include offerings from Seymour Duncan and EMG.

Available woods for both series include Basswood and Mahogany bodies. Imperator guitars offer Mahogany necks with Rosewood fingerboards, and Arkane guitars feature Maple necks with rosewood fingerboards.

All Lâg bolt-on neck guitars feature an exclusive Lâg neck-body alignment design feature that is incorporated during the build process, and allows the neck to stay perfectly aligned with the body at all times. Another advantage is greatly improved sound transmission between the neck and the body because of the way the neck and body bond together.

The Lag Arkane & Imperator solidbody guitars are now available with U.S. street prices ranging from $199 - $1,299.

For more information:
www.lagguitars.com

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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