Neo Instruments Announces the Ventilator II

Three rotary pots allow adjustment of rotor Speed Control (slow to fast), Balance, and Drive.

Germany (May 12, 2014) -- Neo Instruments has introduced the Ventilator II, an effects device that emulates and faithfully reproduces the famed Leslie Model 122 rotary speaker sound. The company, based in Fulda, Germany, is manufacturing the Ventilator ll as a second-generation version of its successful Ventilator and a companion to two existing “mini VENTs” designed for both guitar and keyboard.

The original Ventilator is used by many touring artists including Chuck Leavell (Rolling Stones) and Craig Frost (Bob Seger). Guitar greats Steve Miller and John Mayer also use the Ventilator in their rigs.

Housed in a rugged metal chassis measuring 6”x 5.25”x 2.25” the Ventilator II fits easily on the top of a keyboard rig or on a guitar pedal board. Three rotary pots allow adjustment of rotor Speed Control (slow to fast), Balance, and Drive. In addition, separate pots control a unique virtual mic placement feature – one for the low bass rotor and one for the high rotary horn– that simulates close to distant microphone positions for each “driver”. Three footswitches provide Bypass, Speed Control, and Stop.

Specs:

  • Independent emulations of bass and treble rotors
  • Same 800Hz crossover as original Leslie 122
  • Adjustable rotary speed and acceleration
  • Drive section that simulates tube saturation of Leslie amp
  • Variable placement of virtual microphones
  • Relay-equipped true bypass circuit
  • Speed or Mix Control via Expression Pedal
  • Independent mix control for lo and hi rotor
  • Speaker simulation may be switched off for guitar amps
  • Port for remote footswitch
  • Controls for Fast Speed, Slow Speed, Balance, Acceleration, Drive, Mode (Gtr1, Gtr2, Key), Mix/Distance Lo, Mix/Distance Hi, Input Level Hi / Low, Remote select (Switch, Pedal Speed, Pedal Mix)
  • Unbalanced 1/4” connectors: Input L, Input R /Mono, Out L, Out R /Mono, Remote, 12V DC
  • Power supply: universal 12 volt included

The Ventilator II will ship in June 2014 and is distributed in North America by Gand Distributing, Northfield, IL

For more information:
Neo Instruments

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