The Immerse houses eight stellar stereo reverbs including wet, hall, plate, and spring settings.

Santa Ana, California (January 19, 2016) -- Neunaber Audio Effects announces the launch of the Immerse Reverberator Pedal. Immerse will preview at The NAMM Show 2016 and be available for purchase mid-February.

The Neunaber Immerse houses eight stellar stereo reverbs, each painstakingly crafted: Wet, hall, plate & spring reverbs, two shimmers, Wet+echo, and Wet+detune. Simply select the effect using the center knob, and the outer four knobs adjust its parameters—fully tailoring the effect to the player's preference.

Delivering unrivaled sound quality and no-nonsense flexibility in a compact footprint, the Immerse can be used with instruments of all types.

Features:

  • Controls for Effect Select, Effect Level, Reverb Depth, Tone and Effect Adjust
  • Input and output can be used mono or full stereo
  • Kill Dry switch for parallel effect loops
  • Switch for trails or normal bypass
  • High-quality buffered bypass
  • Analog dry signal for low noise and no latency
  • Small footprint: 4.6" x 2.9" x 2.0" (116mm x 73mm x 49mm)
  • (Powered by a standard 9V pedal power supply 70 mA minimum, not included)
  • Designed and manufactured in California USA

Watch the company's demo video:

For more information:
Neunaber Audio Effects

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x