Retro-Sonic Unveils New Flanger

An analog recreation of a classic '70s flanger.

Ottawa, Canada (July 12, 2019) -- The Retro-Sonic Flanger provides the distinctive liquidy character and chorusy flanging of the late seventies “18v Electric Mistress”. This “true to original” all analog modern recreation of the original uses a BBD path as the original unit to recreate the classic EM tones. These early original versions are known for being very noisy (even when they were switched off) and had a nasty volume drop when engaged. These issues have been corrected in this modernized version of the pedal.

The Retro-Sonic Flanger is capable of a wide range of sounds from chorusing to vibrato, to classic sweeping flange. The circuited is designed to emulate the wide sweep of the original and runs optimally at 18v just like the original V2 EM.

Features:

  • Rate, Range and Color control
  • Overall Level control to adjust perfect unity gain (no volume drop)
  • Heavy duty foot switch for True By-Pass switching
  • Analog BBD delay path
  • Powered by 12-18VDC

U.S. Street price $199.00

For more information:
Retro-Sonic

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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