Audio clips were recorded with a PRS SE HBII into a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe mic’d up with a Shure SM57 into Logic Pro X.
Rhythm guitar (right side): Bridge pickup, peak at 3 o’clock, gain at noon, band pass mode, hi range
Lead guitar (left side): Middle pickup, peak at 1 o’clock, gain at 1 o’clock, low pass mode, hi range

 

Ratings

Pros:
Authentic vintage-style tones. Handy output level feature.

Cons:
A bit thin sounding in the high-pass mode.

Street:
$179

Keeley Neutrino
rkfx.com


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Keeley’s latest iteration of their dynamically funky envelope filter is addictive, musical, and just plain fun. This version includes a handy output-gain trim pot on the side, a direction control switch, and the expected gain, mode, and peak controls. The Neutrino is based around an optocoupler, much like the classic Mu-Tron, which gives it a more nuanced (and pleasing) dynamic range. In other digital-based circuits the tracking can be questionable, with harsh high end, but Keeley’s Neutrino design squashes those concerns.

The Neutrino is based around an optocoupler, much like the classic Mu-Tron, which gives it a more nuanced (and pleasing) dynamic range.

In short, an envelope filter responds to the output of your instrument to emulate how your foot would sweep a traditional wah pedal. Think of Jerry Garcia on “Shakedown Street” or Steve Wonder’s clavinet sound on “Higher Ground.” Each mode of the Neutrino offers a different tonal take: some are funky, others more atmospheric and lo-fi, but they are all musical and deep. I jumped in after the Garcia “quack” tone and was stoked to see how close the Neutrino could get. The response felt immediate and satisfying. For harder funk-style strumming, I backed off the gain a bit and upped the peak control. Watch out Nile Rodgers! Keeley has once again improved on a beloved classic and made it affordable, rugged, and accessible.

Test Gear: PRS SE Hollowbody II, Schroeder Chopper TL, Fender Hot Rod Deluxe