B.C. Rich Announces the NJ Retro Series

A throwback to the classic 1980s NJ models built in Nagoya, Japan.

Hebron, KY (September 11, 2015) -- After many requests, BC Rich Guitars releases the NJ Retro Series. These electric guitars are a throwback to the classic 1980s NJ models built in Nagoya, Japan. This series includes the Warlock, Mockingbird, and Bich models. The NJ Retro series is available now through dealers and distributors worldwide.

The NJ Retro’s feature a maple neck-through-body with mahogany wings in either a Ferrari Red or Cherry Sunburst pearl finish. The 24 5/8” scale neck features a glossed modern “C” shape, 12” radius rosewood fretboard, jumbo frets, and BCR diamond white pearl inlays. The neck also features a 43mm graphite nut, a dual action truss rod, and their traditional 3-per-side headstock with the old school trinity logo and die-cast tuning keys.

Electronically, each guitar is fitted with the BCR1983 - Classic Reissue humbucker pickups in the neck and bridge positions. A Classic Quad bridge is standard. Controls include a separate bridge and neck volumes, a master tone, and a three-way toggle.

MSRP: $599 USD

For more information:
B.C. Rich

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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