Cordoba Guitars Announces the C12

Cordoba Guitars is proud to announce the C12, a brand new all-solid model featuring a lattice bracing pattern that is perfect for the musician searching for a more modern style build, and big, open sound.

Santa Monica, CA (April 11, 2013) -- Cordoba Guitars is proud to announce the C12, a brand new all-solid model featuring a lattice bracing pattern that is perfect for the musician searching for a more modern style build, and big, open sound. Unlike traditional classical guitars, the C12 is also built with a raised ebony fingerboard that allows for enhanced playability when accessing the upper frets. The top of the line in the Luthier series, the C12 is handmade using traditional Spanish construction techniques such as the Spanish heel, hand carved neck and braces, and a domed soundboard built on a traditional solera. Appointments such as the Luthier Series’ signature 1920s mother-of-pearl rosette and striking flamed maple bindings and back wedge accenting its solid Indian rosewood back make the C12 a truly eye-catching guitar. Like all models in the Luthier Series, the C12 includes a two-way adjustable truss rod, Cordoba’s premium black and gold tuning machines, and a deluxe Cordoba humidified archtop wood case.

C12 Specs:
Solid Canadian cedar or solid European spruce top, solid Indian rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with raised ebony fingerboard, natural high gloss PU finish, 52mm nut width, 650mm scale length, Savarez Cristal Corum strings. Includes deluxe Cordoba humidified archtop wood case.

MSRP: $2,025

Street: $1,599

For more information:
Cordoba

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