A compact version of the company's high-gain Muff that features extensive EQ controls and a built-in noise gate.

New York City, NY (December 30, 2020) -- Electro-Harmonix introduces a new, compact version of the award-winning Metal Muff distortion pedal featuring extensive EQ control and a built-in noise gate with dedicated LED. The Nano Metal Muff’s EQ section: Bass +/- 14dB of cut or boost, Mid +/- 15dB and Treble +/- 10dB, equip the pedal to cover a broad tonal landscape and appeal to metal players who demand a wide array of high gain tones.

Its VOL control sets the pedal’s output level while its DIST knob adjusts the Nano Metal Muff’s input gain and distortion. A newly designed noise gate removes unwanted hum when you stop playing. It utilizes an adjustable noise floor threshold and includes a dedicated LED which indicates when the output signal is muted.

The Nano Metal Muff comes equipped with a 9 Volt battery and accepts a standard EHX 9.6DC200mA power supply. It features a USA street price of $72.70.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

Luxe looks and a sweet playing feel make this Squier an anniversary edition worth celebrating.

Slinky playability. Very nice construction quality. An attractive, celebratory mash-up of Fender style elements.

Neck feels slightly generic.

$599

Squier 40th Anniversary Stratocaster
fender.com

4.5
4.5
4

Premier Guitar doesn’t often review anniversary edition instruments—most of them being marketing exercises in disguise. But the Squier 40th Anniversary Stratocaster genuinely seems to embody much about where Squier has been and the reliable source for quality, affordable, and, yes, beautiful guitars they have become.

Read MoreShow less

See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

My years-long search for the “right” Bigsby-outfitted box finally paid off. Now how do I make this sumbitch work in my band?

Considering the amount of time I’ve spent (here and elsewhere) talking about and lusting after Gretsch hollowbody guitars, it’s taken me a remarkably long time to end up with a big Bigsby-outfitted box I truly love. High-end Gretsches are pricey enough that, for a long time, I just couldn’t swing it. Years ago I had an Electromatic for a while, and it looked and played lovely, but didn’t have the open, blooming acoustic resonance I hoped for. A while later, I reviewed the stellar Players Edition Broadkaster semi-hollow, and it was so great in so many ways that I set my sights on it, eventually got one, and adore it to this day. Yet the full-hollowbody lust remained.

Read MoreShow less
x