This 2x12 combo is powered by two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6BQ5/EL84 power tubes.

Scottsdale, AZ (January 6, 2014) -- Fender is proud to release the latest offering from the popular Pawn Shop Special series, the Vaporizer.

Fender's Vaporizer amp evokes the 1950s-'60s age of the Space Race, when the atom-age world became enthralled with spaceflight and spacecraft. When the wild flights of fancy it launched permeated culture everywhere from film and television to cars, guitars, appliances and more--everything was bright, colorful and flashy. Garage bands blasted off with guitar music, and legions of musicians who couldn't swing pro gear bashed away on department-store guitars and amps.

The Vaporizer amp blasts you like a ray gun back to that exciting era. Affordable and out of this world, it would've been right at home aboard a Mercury capsule and down in the backyard fallout shelter. It would've been stumbled on decades later in some pawn shop corner by an unconventional guitarist with an ear for the distinctive and an eye for the stylish.

The Vaporizer features 12 watts of all-tube output power (2 x 12AX7 preamp tubes, 2 x 6BQ5/EL84 power tubes) through two 10” 16-Ohm Special Design Vaporizer speakers. Additional features include a spring reverb circuit independent of amp volume control, which creates a full, wet reverb for a moody “late-night” vibe and approximates the sound of playing in a tunnel. The included single-button “wedge” footswitch selects the “vaporizer mode” (bypasses volume and tone controls for full-strength overload, indicated by a red jewel light).

MSRP: $549.99

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Fender

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