Function f(x) Releases The Third Rail

For their second pedal, Function f(x) brings you a dual-channel overdrive.

Elk Grove Village, IL (September 9, 2015) -- Effect pedal manufacturer Function f(x) LLC today announced the launch of The Third Rail, the company's second product and follow-up to the successful Clusterfuzz. Featuring two independent overdrive channels in a single box, The Third Rail offers six knobs and four switches to delight tone tweakers worldwide. The Third Rail is a novel design that utilizes modern components for consistent performance and a long operational life. And just like company’s other offerings, there is no pixie dust inside the box; just great tone supported by solid circuit design and manufacturing practices.

Designed for guitarists who need a wide array of overdrive tones from a single pedal, The Third Rail offers players a one-of-a-kind bypass system that allows them to craft the sounds they need with minimal tap-dancing while on stage. And like all Function f(x) products, The Third Rail sports a relay-based bypass switching system that the company developed in-house.

Features:

  • Wide variety of tonal options from six control knobs, four toggle switches, and three bypass modes
  • Three diode clipping options independent to each overdrive channel
  • Relay-based bypass switching system for click-free switching
  • Multiple bypass modes for maximum flexibility in live situations
  • Powder-coated and laser-etched aluminum enclosure for great looks and durability
  • Operates on +9V DC center-negative power, the industry standard

$269

For more information:
Function f(x)

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