Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

Quick Hit: SviSound Techno-FA Review

This pint-sized, Premier Gear-winning analog phaser gives all but the most full-featured swooshers a serious run for their money.

Hailing from Count Dracula's favorite shipping port (Varna, Bulgaria), the SviSound Techno-FA is, pound for pound, inch for inch, one the most powerfully addicting phasers on the market. Packed into its 1.5" x 3.6" steel housing is an analog circuit with four mini knobs—frequency (rate), range (how far the effect shifts in each cycle), bright, and depth—a pushbutton for selecting two- or four-stage phasing, and a slightly confusing array of sci-fi-cool LEDs indicating effect status, stage selection, and phasing rate.

Simply put, the FA is one of those effects that immediately inspires. For disorientingly warbled—but still classic-sounding—aural vortexes, choose four-stage mode and crank the range knob. For a cushier, more inviting vintage sound that can lull you into blissful oblivion in myriad ways, choose two-stage mode and tune to taste. The bright control is a genius inclusion, but regardless, virtually every setting seamlessly melds with your overall tone. About the only way designer Mark Svirkov could improve it would be to somehow defy physics and fit an expression-pedal jack on the housing so you could modify effect rate while playing. A must-try for the vintage-inclined player looking for tiny but mighty!

Test Gear: Squier Vintage Modified Tele with Curtis Novak JM-V and Tel-V pickups, Fender '64 Custom Deluxe Reverb

Clip 1 — Squier Vintage Modified Telecaster with Curtis Novak Tel-V bridge and JM-V pickups, in the middle pickup position, into SviSound—first in two-stage mode, then in four-stage mode, with frequency at 9 o'clock, range at noon, bright at min, and depth at max—then into a Fender '64 Custom Deluxe Reverb miked by a Royer R-121 feeding an Apogee Duet going into GarageBand with no EQ-ing, compression, or effects.
Clip 2 — Squier Vintage Modified Telecaster with Curtis Novak Tel-V bridge and JM-V pickups, in the middle pickup position, into SviSound—first in two-stage mode, then in four-stage mode, with frequency at max, range at max, bright at min, and depth at max —then into a Fender '64 Custom Deluxe Reverb miked by a Royer R-121 feeding an Apogee Duet going into GarageBand with no EQ-ing, compression, or effects.

Ratings

Pros:
Unusual and super-useful control set. Great variety of beautiful phase sounds in a miniscule footprint.

Cons:
Control labels difficult to read.

Street:
$169

SviSound Techno-FA
svisound.com

Tones:

Ease of Use:

Build/Design:

Value:

With a team of experts on hand, we look at six workhorse vintage amps you can still find for around $1,000 or less.

If you survey the gear that shows up on stages and studios for long enough, you’ll spot some patterns in the kinds of guitar amplification players are using. There’s the rotating cast of backline badasses that do the bulk of the work cranking it out every day and night—we’re all looking at you, ’65 Deluxe Reverb reissue.

Read MoreShow less

George Benson’s Dreams Do Come True: When George Benson Meets Robert Farnonwas recorded in 1989. The collaboration came about after Quincy Jones told the guitarist that Farnon was “the greatest arranger in all the world.”

Photo by Matt Furman

The jazz-guitar master and pop superstar opens up the archive to release 1989’s Dreams Do Come True: When George Benson Meets Robert Farnon, and he promises more fresh collab tracks are on the way.

“Like everything in life, there’s always more to be discovered,”George Benson writes in the liner notes to his new archival release, Dreams Do Come True: When George Benson Meets Robert Farnon. He’s talking about meeting Farnon—the arranger, conductor, and composer with credits alongside Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, and Vera Lynn, among many others, plus a host of soundtracks—after Quincy Jones told the guitarist he was “the greatest arranger in all the world.”

Read MoreShow less

The new Jimi Hendrix documentary chronicles the conceptualization and construction of the legendary musician’s recording studio in Manhattan that opened less than a month before his untimely death in 1970. Watch the trailer now.

Read MoreShow less
Rivolta Guitars' Sferata | PG Plays
Rivolta Guitars' Sferata | PG Plays

PG contributor Tom Butwin dives into the Rivolta Sferata, part of the exciting new Forma series. Designed by Dennis Fano and crafted in Korea, the Sferata stands out with its lightweight simaruba wood construction and set-neck design for incredible playability.

Read MoreShow less