Quick Hit: Traveler Guitar LTD EC-1 Review

If you’re burned out on TSA hassles or have even given up on traveling with a guitar, here’s a way to fret more and fret less at the same time.

The “travel guitar” moniker often just means an instrument is smaller, cheaper, and/or kind of toy-like. Not so with Traveler Guitar. They’ve been in the portable-guitar biz for 25 years and have built a reputation on quality construction and full-scale playability, so guitarists don’t feel like they’re giving something up by going stealth.

The all-mahogany, ESP-humbucker-loaded LTD EC-1 speaks to the aforementioned construction. I didn’t find a single blemish or component connection off-kilter, the fretwork was clean and buttery smooth, and the setup excellent. One of the coolest features of a Traveler is the ability to simply plug in a set of headphones and rip wherever and however loud you like. Opting for headphones to start, I effortlessly shifted through the four available settings—clean, boost, overdrive, and distortion—which are accessed through the push-activated tone pot. Strong, distinct, unwanted-noise-free tones were delivered thanks to the EC-1’s preamp and active pickup, and each setting inspired sound-appropriate riffing. (I spent most of my time in overdrive land thanks to its creamy growl.)

The EC-1 is a light and tight guitar that’s fun to play, but spending $600 on what will likely be an auxiliary axe might sting a bit. However, for those who simply must have a guitar in close range always, and one that actually plays/sounds like a real instrument you’d be fine gigging with, the EC-1 will fit that role nicely.

Test gear: Monster Inspiration headphones, Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 interface, C.M.I. Electronics SG-212 combo

 

Ratings

Pros:
Impressive build, good tones, onboard effects, and you can take it and play it just about anywhere. Nice gig bag.

Cons:
Tuners take some getting used to.

Street:
$599

Traveler Guitar LTD EC-1
travelerguitar.com

Tones:

Playability:

Build/Design:

Value:

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