ISP Technologies Introduces the Stealth Power Amp

Waterford, MI (January 14, 2012) – The ISP Technologies introduces the Stealth Power Amplifier, a high power floor mount guitar power amplifier delivering performance on par with the best

Waterford, MI (January 14, 2012) – The ISP Technologies introduces the Stealth Power Amplifier, a high power floor mount guitar power amplifier delivering performance on par with the best guitar amplifiers of the day. The Stealth is based on analog class A/B amplifier design for excellent sonic and saturated clipping performance, not found with Class D power amplifiers and will exceed the stringent tone characteristics of the professional guitarist. The Stealth Power Amplifier can be used for high SPL gigs and professional stage use. The Stealth Power Amplifier is powered from an external 19 volt DC switch-mode power adaptor like that used with a laptop but will deliver a TRUE 180 watts RMS continuous output power into an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and greater than 120 volts bridged output voltage swing. The Stealth Power Amplifier can also be used as a stereo 2x 80 watt amplifier @ 4 ohms. The Stealth can power a single 4 x 12 cabinet with incredible SPL volume level output or will power two cabinets in a true stereo rig. This incredible small package will deliver more power to a speaker than the typical 100 watt guitar amplifier and will easily interface with any guitar floor system or high performance pedal board. The Stealth Power Amplifier with 180 watts of power weighs in at only 1.2 pounds, adding new meaning to light weight guitar systems. The Stealth and also delivers amazing efficiency and it includes internal protection against shorts, open circuits and wrong impedance loads. An internal “power on/off” output control circuit provides pop free operation for turn on and turn off. The Stealth’s small package size of 9 inches long, 4 inches wide and 2 inches tall allows it to fit with any floor mounted pedal rig.

The Stealth Power Amplifier is based on ISP Technologies new patent pending “Power Factor” and “Dynamic Adaptive Amplifier Technology” and is the only power amplifier technology capable of delivering this level of output power with a 19 volt DC power pack.

Features:
• Usable in Stereo 2x80 watts or Mono Bridged 1x 180 watts
• Smallest lightest high power amplifier for the guitarist available 9 X 4 X 2 inches 1.2 lbs
• External 19VCD switch-mode power supply included for operation from 100VAC to 240VAC
• Class A/B amplifier circuit for analog saturation and clipping sonic performance
• Internal protection for shorts and open circuit
• Time Delay operation for POP free turn on / turn off

For more information:
www.isptechnologies.com

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
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When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

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"'If I fall and somehow my career ends on that particular day, then so be it," Joe Bonamassa says of his new hobby, bicycling. "If it's over, it's over. You've got to enjoy your life."

Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

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