Keeley Electronics have announced the Red Dirt Overdrive, a pedal that can cover a range of tones from classic subtle blues to contemporary high-gain crunch.

Edmond, OK (March 5, 2013) -- Keeley Electronics is proud to welcome the Red Dirt overdrive, the newest member of the award-winning Keeley Electronics family of custom effects pedals. The result of over 10 years of research and fine tuning development of its existing modified pedal lineup, the Keeley Electronics Red Dirt overdrive delivers a range of tones from classic subtle blues to contemporary high-gain crunch.

The Red Dirt overdrive began from a quest to find the perfect classic drive sound while also offering new levels of sonic versatility to satisfy a wider range of musical styles. Founder and head engineer Robert Keeley took this idea and combined the great sounds found within his original “Mod Plus” and “Baked” modified pedals and added refinements found exclusively in his custom pedal line. By incorporating these tones along with the Keeley standard of U.S.A. hand-built quality using premium components, the Red Dirt overdrive aims to become an indispensable part of any pedal chain.

Specs:

  • Dirt control that offers an extremely dynamic, touch-sensitive gain at both mild and heavier sustain settings
  • Tone control that delivers an extended range of useable voicing to match the needs of virtually any guitar and amp combination
  • Volume control that can effectively balance the signal or push an amp into further sustain and overdrive with authority
  • Hand-built in the U.S.A. using the finest components and construction techniques
  • Beautifully housed and powder coated in a rugged enclosure
  • True bypass switching for pure tone and no signal loss
  • World-class Keeley customer support

The Keeley Electronics Red Dirt overdrive will begin shipping to dealers worldwide this month. It has a street price of $199.

For more information:
Keeley Electronics

Plus, the Fontaines D.C. axeman explains why he’s reticent to fix the microphonic pickup in his ’66 Fender Coronado.

Read More Show less

The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

Read More Show less

Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

Read More Show less
x