Korg Releases the PitchCrow-G Clip-On Tuner

The small, sleek, and accurate tuner has full color LCD display and 24-hour battery life.

Melville, NY (June 29, 2015) -- Korg releases the new PitchCrow-G, a smaller, sleeker, and more accurate clip-on tuner that easily attaches to any headstock and is perfect for all skill levels. The guitar and bass modes, strong ball joint clip, full color LCD display and 24 hour battery life, provide for a streamlined tuning experience.

“The PitchCrow-G’ s ±1 cent precision mode is great for quick and smooth tuning and a ‘first string over-winding warning’ appears in the display to prevent string breakage caused by over-winding the thin first string,” stated Brian Piccolo Brand Manager for Korg Guitar Products. “The most notable change is in the size of the display. Without increasing the size of the meter’s display area, we’ve significantly narrowed the unused space around the edge, resulting in a more compact tuner overall and slimmed-down the thickness of the body. The new clip uses a more efficient and simplistic design, resulting in improved strength and reliability, uncompromised holding power on any type of headstock, and maximum flexibility due to the its unique ball joint,” added Piccolo.

For fine tuning in the studio or in a performance setting, the PitchCrow-G provides tuning accuracy of up to ±0.1 cents, eliminating even the slightest pitch discrepancy. In addition to the conventional chromatic mode, there is also a dedicated guitar mode and bass mode. In each mode, the string number is shown beside the note name, allowing even the beginner to tune with ease.

The lighter and stronger build allow the PitchCrow-G to deliver a more advanced tuning experience for all guitarists and bassists.

Features:

  • Scale: 12-note equal temperament
  • Detection Accuracy: ±0.1 cent (fine tuning)
  • Tuning Range (sine wave):
    • Chromatic: A0 (27.50Hz) – C8 (4186Hz)
    • Guitar: B1 flat5 (46.25Hz) – E4 capo7 (493.88Hz)
    • Bass: B0 flat5 B0 flat5 (23.12Hz) – C3 (130.81Hz)
  • Reference Tone: 436 – 445 Hz (1 Hz steps)
  • Flat Tuning: 1 – 5 semitones (In semitones steps)
  • Capotasto Tuning: 1 – 7 semitones (In semitones steps)
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): 63 x 56 x 25 mm / 2.48 x 2.20 x 0.98 inches (minimum size)
  • Weight: 21 g / 0.74 oz. (including battery)
  • Battery Life: Approximately 8 hours (tuner continuously operating, A4 input)
  • Color Variations: Black (AW-4G-BK), White (AW-4G-WH)
  • Included Items: CR2032 lithium battery (3V) x 1 (for verifying operation)

For more information:
Korg

On Black Midi's Cavalcade, Geordie Greep’s fretwork is an example of the 6-string as a capable component as much as a solo instrument, never completely stealing the show.

Popular music and mainstream tastes may be more fractured than ever, but the guitar continues to thrive.

As we soft launch into the new year, I’m not waiting for the requisite guitar obituary in the news. It’s not going to happen again anytime soon. Why? Because as far as the mainstream media is concerned, our beloved instrument is not only dead, it's irrelevant to the point of not even being an afterthought. When the New York Times published their most recent albums of the year list, there was barely a guitar-based recording to be found. Still, there is not only hope, but also cause for jubilation.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x