Planet Waves Releases the Guitar Rest

The Guitar Rest turns virtually any flat surface into a guitar stand.

Anaheim, CA (February 8, 2011) – Planet Waves is excited to announce the introduction of the Guitar Rest, a simple solution to help keep your guitar safe.

The Guitar Rest turns virtually any flat surface into a guitar stand. Simply lay the Guitar Rest over the edge of a flat surface and lean your instrument against the “neck pocket.” This innovative design allows your guitar to rest securely in any situation.

Perfect for situations where a guitar stand is unavailable or inconvenient, the Guitar Rest is made from pliable, finish-safe santoprene and resists movement on practically any surface, including amplifiers, tables, chairs, or desks. The Guitar Rest from Planet Waves also easily fits into any case or gig bag so players can take it wherever they go.

“Planet Waves has developed the Guitar Rest to solve the common problem that every guitarist encounters,” says Planet Waves’ Product Specialist, Rob Cunningham. “The Guitar Rest allows the guitarist to put their guitar down without having to worry about it falling over or being damaged.”

The Planet Waves Guitar Rest will be available February 1, 2011 and will retail for $12.99.

For more information:
Planet Waves

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