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Ten 2x12 Cabs to Try

Ten 2x12 Cabs to Try

Going from one speaker to two can add depth, dimension, and punch. Here are 10 from across the stylistic spectrum.


Zilla Fatboy 2x12

This oversized closed-back 2x12 aims to emulate the response of a 4x12 with added low-end punch and can be preloaded with a handful of different speaker options.

Starts at $432 street
zillacabs.com

Blackstar St. James 212VOC

This newly designed cab is up to 35 percent lighter than a normal 2x12 set up. It also has a removable rear panel and comes loaded with Celestion Zephyr speakers.

$749 street

Blackstaramps.com

Mesa/Boogie Rectifier Compact 2x12

Modern metal-ers will rejoice with this 120-watt closed-back cab that is constructed with marine-grade Baltic birch. The rear-mounted Celestion V30 speakers round out the package along with the twisted jute-dipped grille filters.

$749 street

mesaboogie.com

Avatar 3D Vertical Forte Replica

The standout feature of this cab are the side vents, which give your sound a wider feel. It’s constructed with 13-ply void-less Baltic birch and is available with either customized speaker options or totally bare.

$698 street

avatarspeakers.com

Marshall ORI212A Origin

Classic styling meets modern construction in this retro-flavored vertical cab. The Celestion Seventy 80 speakers offer 160 watts of power, and the angled setup is decidedly British.

$549 street

marshall.com

Orange PPC 212

You can’t miss the trademark Orange vibe of this beefy horizontal 2x12 cab. Brit-style tones are right at home with a pair of Celestion Vintage 30 speakers and a closed-back design.

$899 street

orangeamps.com

Vox V212C

For fans of that unmistakable chime, this Vox cab not only matches the vibe of an AC30 but spreads the sound out a bit with its open back. A pair of Celestion G12M speakers aim to offer clarity and warmth.

$599 street

voxamps.com

EVH 5150III 2x12 Extension Cab

Designed to King Eddie’s demanding specs, this straight-front cab is a powerhouse and features old-school tilt-back legs. Inside is a pair of Celestion G12H speakers and a very handy built-in head-mounting mechanism for the EVH 50-watt head.

$599 street

evhgear.com

PRS HDRX 2x12

As a tribute to the sound of late-’60s rock guitar, the PRS HDRX line is vintage flavored and full of vibe. This closed-back cab features the decidedly British Celestion G12H-75 Creamback speakers and poplar plywood construction.

$899 street

prsguitars.com

MojoTone 2x12 West Coast Cab

The wood wizards in the cab shop at MojoTone offer a mind-boggling number of options, right down to the piping and Tolex. This one comes stocked with Celestion G12M-65 Creamback speakers and an oval-ported rear panel.

$774 street

mojotone.com


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danelectro.com

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