Brisbane, CA (November 27, 2008) -- Recording King announces another line of guitars within the Century family; the Jubilee series. These guitars are the result of Recording King''s attempt to

Brisbane, CA (November 27, 2008) -- Recording King announces another line of guitars within the Century family; the Jubilee series. These guitars are the result of Recording King's attempt to reach back to the 1930s and pull out those classic tones and nostalgic looks.

According to Recording King, each guitar is built with lighter bracing for more resonance, and the ebony pyramid bridge helps enable greater vibration from the hand-selected tops. They also believe that both the gloss and matte finishes allow the guitars to sing powerfully and clearly. The Nitrocellulose lacquer finish is dried for 8 weeks in order to insure that the lacquer is properly bonded to the wood. The guitars feature a vintage 2-tone tobacco sunburst finish.



  • Solid Sitka spruce Top
  • Solid mahogany, maple or rosewood back and sides
  • One-piece mahogany neck
  • 25.4", 20 nickel frets on Rosewood fretboard
  • Ebony Pyramid bridge
  • D'Addario Phosphor Bronze Lights
  • Grover tuners
  • 1 3/4" bone nut
The new Jubilee series will be launched to Recording King dealers in December 2008 with a starting MSRP $599.

For more info:
Recording King

My years-long search for the “right” Bigsby-outfitted box finally paid off. Now how do I make this sumbitch work in my band?

Considering the amount of time I’ve spent (here and elsewhere) talking about and lusting after Gretsch hollowbody guitars, it’s taken me a remarkably long time to end up with a big Bigsby-outfitted box I truly love. High-end Gretsches are pricey enough that, for a long time, I just couldn’t swing it. Years ago I had an Electromatic for a while, and it looked and played lovely, but didn’t have the open, blooming acoustic resonance I hoped for. A while later, I reviewed the stellar Players Edition Broadkaster semi-hollow, and it was so great in so many ways that I set my sights on it, eventually got one, and adore it to this day. Yet the full-hollowbody lust remained.

Read MoreShow less

See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

How does a legacy artist stay on top of his game? The pianist, hit singer-songwriter, producer, and composer talks about the importance of musical growth and positive affirmation; his love for angular melodicism; playing jazz, pop, classical, bluegrass, jam, and soundtrack music; and collaborating with his favorite guitarists, including Pat Metheny and Jerry Garcia.

Read MoreShow less
x