Reunion Blues Releases RBX Series of Gig Bags

Each bag is constructed using the RBX Protection System, which features a lightweight, ultra-protective multi-layer foam surround, and strategically placed impact panels.

Petaluma, CA (December 26, 2013) -- For nearly 40 years, Reunion Blues has crafted the world’s finest gig bags. With the official debut of the new RBX Series, they have once again demonstrated the brands unrivaled design innovation. “The RBX Series represents a fusion of our passion for quality, and the desire to make an affordable, lightweight, and protective gig bag perfect for musicians on the go”, says Director of Product Development Dave Andrus. The essence of this passion is reflected in the sleek aesthetic design of RBX bags, from the Quilted Chevron exterior, to the padded Blue Luster lining.

Beyond striking visual aesthetic, RBX bags are defined by their finely tuned blend of form and function. Each bag is constructed using the RBX Protection System, which features a lightweight, ultra-protective multi-layer foam surround, and strategically placed impact panels. For targeted protection, a dense foam neck cradle and endpin rest keep the guitar safe and secure within the bag.

RBX is designed for musicians on the go. Whether traveling by car, train, bus, or bike, RBX bags are easy to carry, and keep gear protected. Padded backpack straps, an integrated subway grip and Reunion Blues signature Zero-G handle make getting around town a breeze. A large, low profile front pocket includes a cable loop and organizer to keep all your accessories right where you need them, and provides ample storage without adding bulk. Best of all, RBX gig bags are priced to sell, and include Reunion Blues Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Street prices will range between $99.95 (electric models) and $119.95 (acoustic models).

For more information:
Reunion Blues

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