A scaled-down version of the classic amp.

Los Angeles, CA (October 27, 2016) -- Roland has released the JC-22, the latest model in the long-running Jazz Chorus guitar amplifier series. The JC-22 offers Roland’s classic JC clean tone and famous Dimensional Space Chorus effect in a compact amp that’s perfect for playing at home. Built to the same standards of sound and durability that the amp series is noted for, the JC-22 makes legendary JC tone more accessible than ever.

Around the world, the Roland JC series is renowned as the benchmark in clean guitar amplification. With the JC-22, home players can now enjoy that authentic tone in a light, compact package. Offering the essential features of the popular JC-40 in an even more scaled-down size, the versatile JC-22 also works well for intimate performances and recording.

Two independent power amps and custom-designed speakers deliver the genuine clean sound of the larger JC amps, while the trademark Dimensional Space Chorus effect fills the room with immersive 3D sound. The amp also includes a great-sounding reverb that operates in true stereo for rich, expansive tone.

The JC-22’s clean tone is an ideal platform for all types of stompbox pedals. In addition to a standard mono input, the amp features a front-panel stereo input for connecting stereo effects devices. The JC-22 works great with stereo-capable delay, reverb, and modulation pedals, and it’s also perfectly suited for advanced gear that employs amp modeling, multi-effects, and/or synth capabilities.

The JC-22’s rear panel is outfitted with lots of connectivity. The effects loop works with mono or stereo devices, and offers selectable serial or parallel operation. Line Out jacks provide a convenient mono or stereo feed to a mixing board or recorder, while the headphones jack is great for quiet practice. Users can also connect optional footswitches to turn the JC-22’s chorus and reverb effects on/off while playing.

Watch the company's demo video:

For more information:
Roland

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